Chinese Hamster

 

The Chinese hamster is different from all the other hamsters that are available for one reason. They have a tail! The chinese hamster, sometimes called the Mouse hamster (because of the tail, and rather large ears!) is an interesting creature, quite unlike any other hammy you’ll have come across.

They originate from the deserts of northern China and Mongolia. They are not actually, true dwarf hamsters but are a similar size and shape. They’re fairly small, reaching sizes of up to around 10cm when fully grown.

The Chinese hamster generally good natured. However, they can be one of the hardest of all hamsters to tame. Though they don’t bite much, or nip, they are extremely timid and it can take months to gain their trust. As all dwarf hamsters, they’re quick-moving and require a speedy eye and careful hand to catch them. For these reasons, they are not suitable for kids.

Appearance:

The Chinese hamster, much like the russian hamsters, have a stripe down the middle of their back. They have, as I mentioned earlier, a medium sized tail. It is certainly not as long as a rat’s, but it’s long enough to be noticeable (about an inch).They have beady black eyes and their main coat type is called “agouti”, fair-coloured fur with a black stripe. The only other pattern seen in Chinese hamsters is the “Dominant Spot”. A hamster with “Dominant Spots” will usually have large, dark spots across their back.

Other Information:

Chinese hamsters can live alone, in pairs, or in groups. However, fighting is extremely common between pairs and groups, so it is advised to keep them individually.

Chinese hamsters are often quite hard to get, as regular pet shops don’t usually keep them. If you want one, it’s best to go straight to a breeder. However, check that your county, state and even country allows them in your area. Some places like California, require a permit in order to have one, so do your homework first!

 

 

 

One thought on “Chinese Hamster

  1. I have a Chinese hamster, Luna, whom I tamed in about a week. I started by putting my hand in her cage slowly, then progressing to hand feeding her treats. In about a week I was able to scoop her in my hands and hold her for a short time. Now she is completely tame and loves to sit on my arm and to be petted. She doesn’t jump out of my hands and plays a climbing game with my alternating palms.

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